Thursday, June 28, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Gram's Scrapbook

My paternal grandmother, Mamie Olive (Martindale) Spurlock, kept a scrapbook in which she glued all manner of things: newspaper announcements of births and marriages, obituaries, telegrams, church programs, war ration books, membership cards, and of course, photos. When she died in 1971, my sister Jane was given the scrapbook; when Jane died in 2004, it was passed on to her youngest daughter, Cheryl. Right now I have the scrapbook and I'm in the process of scanning everything in it. You can see from this picture that it's in pretty bad shape, and I want to capture all the images before it falls apart completely.

My grandmother glued and pinned items to sheets
of two-hole punched, lined notebook paper and kept them in a binder.



I didn't know Gram very well. She lived in Houston and we lived in California. I remember going to visit once but I was more interested in playing with my cousins than in getting to know my grandmother. I regret that now as I try to piece together who she was by looking at the things she treasured enough to save. Over the coming weeks, I'll share my journey of getting to know my grandmother through her scrapbook.


© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Wordless Wednesday - Daddy c1976

Digital image. Original held by Jennifer Spurlock, [ADDRESS WITHHELD
FOR PRIVACY], Denton, Texas, 2012.
Jasper Jackson "Jack" Spurlock
c1976, Ontario, California

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Sunday's Obituary - George Gandy (1836-1903)

Two obituaries have surfaced for George W. Gandy, my first cousin 4 times removed; both are transcribed below. I was unable to verify the statements in the first obituary, published by the Marysville (Ohio) Tribune, that George served as mayor of two towns in DeWitt County, Illinois—Kenney and Clinton. I posted a query on the Ancestry.com message board seeking confirmation of these statements; Judy Simpson graciously transcribed an obituary she found in the Clinton Register. That obituary contains no reference to his serving as mayor of either town.

“GRIM REAPER
——
Takes Off Native of Union County in Far Away Oklahoma.
——
The recent death of George Gandy, at Lexington, Oklahoma, is of more than passing interest to many of the older residents of Union county. He was the youngest son of Abijah Gandy who helped to clear Leesburg township out of the primeval forest, and for many years was identified with the early history of Union county.

The son, George Gandy, went to Illinois where he rose into prominence, serving as mayor of Clinton and also mayor of Kenny. He moved to Oklahoma three years ago. His body was brought back to Clinton, Illinois, for burial which took place under the auspices of Henderson lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Kenny, Illinois. The deceased was an uncle of L. Meacham, of Woodstock, and was also related to the Clevengers and others about Pharisburg. He was about 75 years of age at his death.”


 
[Source: "Grim Reaper," Marysville Tribune, 5 Aug 1903 (page and column unknown).

“July 10, 1903
Clinton Register

AN UNEXPECTED DEATH.

George W. GANDY, a former resident of this county, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. N. P. GRAHAM, in Lexington, Oklahoma, last Sunday morning, July 5, at 4:20 o’clock. He had been complaining of a dizziness for some days, but he appeared in his usual health, and the day before his death was spent about the streets of Lexington.

George W. Gandy was born in Union county, Ohio, June 5th, 1836, and when 18 years old located in the north part of this state, where he remained about three years, when he came to this county, where he had made his home, until about three years ago, when he went to Lexington, Oklahoma, where he had made his home with Mrs. Graham. He was married to Mrs. Elizabeth HUTCHIN about 38 years ago, but she preceded him to the grave about five years ago.

Mrs. Graham arrived here Tuesday night with the remains. The funeral took place Wednesday at 4 p.m., form Wm. Monson’s residence at 814 West Main street, conducted by Revs. E. A. Gilliland and S. C. Black, after which the remains were laid to rest in Woodlawn. The A. F. and A. M. lodge of Kenney took charge of the remains here.

George W. Gandy was well and favorably known in this county. His disposition was pleasant and agreeable, honest and industrious.”


[Source: Judy Simpson (user name JSimpson8733), "Re: George Gandy," Ancestry.com, DeWitt County, Illinois, message board, 12 June 2012 (http://boards.ancestry.com/ : accessed 12 Jun 2012).]

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Saturday, June 23, 2012

Hunt and Peck or Type by Touch?

Underwood Five typewriter.
Public domain image.
Ah, that is a most appropriate question for today, National Typewriter Day…I type by touch (or perhaps I should say “key by touch”). Typewriters evoke lots of memories for me.

I learned to type on a manual typewriter. Just goes to show how ancient I am. It was one of those courses that I took to fill out my high school class schedule when the school wouldn’t let me take the courses I wanted (long story!). After the first couple of weeks, they wouldn’t let us see the letters on the keys anymore so you had to learn to type by touch! My poor little fingers hurt so bad from pressing the keys hard enough to make a good impression on the paper.

IBM Selectric "Ball"
Public domain image.
By the time I started my first job a few years later, electric typewriters were in offices.  I remember when the company I worked for bought its first correcting typewriter – an IBM Selectric II. It cost about $1200, more than most of us spend for a personal computer today! It was the model with the little ball that you could change for different fonts and had a tape for correcting errors. Very cool! I soon learned to type backwards to correct errors nearly as fast as I could type going forward. The only problem was that it really messed up your carbon copies.

Before long, technology gave us word processors and then personal computers. No longer was the typewriter the indispensable tool of writers and office workers everywhere. I hear there are still some who prefer a typewriter to a computer. Not me!

Yet I still have a typewriter—one I bought close to thirty years ago. It has daisy-wheel font cartridges, will correct errors, and even has memory to record frequently-used phrases. It is in the garage. Maybe I will try to sell it in my garage sale next weekend.

So, my friends and family members, do you “hunt and peck” or type by touch? What memories do you have of the typewriter?



© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Surname Saturday – Ancestor #19 – Sherreldia Jane Hammontree


One of my goals for 2012 is to use the Surname Saturday blogging prompt as a way to assure that I spend some time researching each of my family lines and that I have appropriate source citations for the genealogical facts related to my ancestors. I’ve decided to use my ahnentafel report and work back through the generations starting with my grandparents, writing a summary of each ancestor. If you discovered this post through a search engine and find one of your ancestors listed here, please leave a comment to let me know.

If you discovered this post through a search engine and find one of your ancestors listed here, please leave a comment to let me know.

My paternal 2nd great-grandmother Sherreldia Jane Hammontree was born 10 November 1825[1] probably in Tennessee.[2] Her name is sometimes recorded as Sorilda or Sarilda. She was the daughter of Hugh Hammontree and Rachel Caskey.

Sherreldia Jane Hammontree married Houston T. Owens on 29 December 1841 in Talladega County, Alabama.[3] They had fifteen children:
  • Andrew J. Owens (1841-?)[4]
  • Nancy C. Owens (1843-1930)[5]
  • Missouri Ann Owens (1845-1927)[6]
  • Dialtha Jane Owens (1847-1893)[7] – my great-grandmother
  • Rachel B. Owens (1849-1851)
  • Hughes R. Owens (1851-1916)[8]
  • Rebecca Ursula Owens (1852-1928)[9]
  • Thomas Alexander Owens (1855-1919)[10]
  • Gabriel Houston Owens (1858-1928)[11]
  • Sarah A. Owens (1861-1947)[12]
  • Steward S. Owens (1864-1937)[13]
  • Sarilda Angeline Owens (1866-1906)[14]
  • John Darius Owens (1868-1951)[15]
  • Charles Taylor Owens (1870-1945)[16]
  • Belzora Owens (1872-died young)[17]


Like most of my female ancestors, I know little about Sherreldia. I think she may have borne more children than any of my other grandmothers. One two died young. The rest lived to adulthood.

Sherreldia died 11 December 1896 (just 15 months following her husband’s death) and is buried at Hurricane Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana.[18]

As I research Sherreldia's husband, I hope to find more information about her as well.




[1] Kelly Christian Priestly, "Hurricane Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana," transcription, USGenWeb Archives (http://files.usgwarchives.org/la/claiborne/cemeteries/hurrican.txt : accessed 21 Apr 2010), entry for Sherreldia J. Owens. Sherreldia’s age at date of death was recorded as 71 years, 1 month, 1 day.
[2] 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Western District, Bienville, Louisiana, p. 288A, family 559, household of Huston T. Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Jan 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 230.
[3] Talladega County, Alabama, Marriage Records, 1833-1942, A1: 246, Owens-Hammonthren; Family History microfilm 1,639,298, item 1.
[4] 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Western District, Bienville, Louisiana, p. 288A, family 559, household of Huston T. Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Jan 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 230.
[5] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Nancy C. Owens, Memorial #15477081, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 Aug 2006.
[6] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Missouri Anne Owens Spurlock, Memorial #15541349, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[7] Dialtha Owens Spurlock Photograph of grave marker, 1999; digital image, privately held by Denise Spurlock, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lomita, Callifornia. 2012.
[8] Charles I. Caskey, Descendants of Houston T. Owens.
[9] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Rebecca Ursula Owens Sims, Memorial #21341670, created by Terri Carter, 3 September 2007.
[10] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Thomas Alexander Owens, Memorial #15541142, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[11] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Gabriel Houston Owens, Memorial #15541182, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[12] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Sarah Ann Owens, Memorial #15477146, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 August 2006.
[13] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Steward S. Owens, Memorial #15477194, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 August 2006.
[14] Charles I. Caskey, Descendants of Houston T. Owens.
[15] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), John Darius Owens, Memorial #54034110, created by Debbra, 23 Jun 2010.
[16] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Charles Taylor Owens, Memorial #15477291, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 August 2006.
[17] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Belzora Owens Owens, Memorial #15541105, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[18] Kelly Christian Priestly, "Hurricane Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana," transcription, USGenWeb Archives (http://files.usgwarchives.org/la/claiborne/cemeteries/hurrican.txt : accessed 21 Apr 2010), entry for Sherreldia J. Owens.

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Wordless Wednesday - Daddy c1955

Digital image. Original held by Denise Spurlock, [ADDRESS
WITHHELD FOR PRIVACY], Lomita, California 2012.
Jasper Jackson "Jack" Spurlock
c1955, probably in El Monte, California

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Monday, June 18, 2012

Amanuensis Monday - Deed - Hammontree-Billings 1859


On his TransylvanianDutch blog, John Newmark defines an amanuensis as “a person employed to write out what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.” For more information about this daily blogging prompt, see John’s post Amanuensis – Why?.

I have amassed quite a collection of scans of handwritten documents related to my ancestors—primarily marriage records, deeds, and wills. As I have been transcribing these documents, it occurred to me that most of these documents were not actually written by my ancestors, but rather dictated to someone else, and then transcribed by a clerk into official records.


By 1857, Hugh Hammontree, one of my paternal 3rd great-grandfathers, had purchased a total of approximately 160 acres of land in Bienville Parish. The deed below represents the sale of 20 acres of that land to E. and T. B. Billings, for a mere $3! I haven’t researched the economic conditions of Bienville Parish in 1859, but, at just 15 cents an acre, it seems the Billings got a great deal!

I don’t know what all the dark Xs are on this document, but from their locations, it appears that they may have been made by someone who was indexing the deeds.


“Hugh Hammontree }
To       Deed               }
E. & T. B. Billings     }

Know all men by these presents that I Hugh Hammontree of the Parish of Bienville & State of Louisiana have this day for and in consideration of Three dollars cash to me in hand paid the receipt where is hereby acknowledged, have bargained and sold, and by these presents, do bargain and sell, release and convey unto E. Billings and T. B. Billings of the Parish of Bienville and State of Louisiana their Heirs and assigns forever all of the following described piece or parcel of land, to wit. The West half of the North West fourth of the South East fourth of Section No. five (5) Township Eighteen (18) of Range five (5) containing twenty acres, and I do, by these presents, bind[?] myself my heirs and assigns, jointly, separately [sic], severally and firmly by these presents to warrant and forever defend all my signatory Rights and letters to the above described piece and parcel of Land unto the said E. Billings and T. B. Billings their heirs and assigns, to have and to hold to their own proper use any [?] forever. In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand, and affixed my seal, is pres[en]ts of the subscribing witnesses on the first day of January in the year of our Lord One thousand Eight Hundred and fifty-nine.
Attest signed  G. M. Rogers }          (signed)  Hugh Hammontree  {seal}
                        R. J. Wheaton }        

State of Louisiana     }
Bienville Parish          }
Before me the undersigned authority personally came and appeared R. J. Wheaton one of the attesting witnesses to the foregoing deed who after being duly sworn, deposes and says that he was present and saw Hugh Hammontree sign the same for the purposes therein Expressed. also saw G. M. Rogers sign the same as a witness with himself all in presence of Each other & now Recognizes their signatures and that of his own as genuine.
Sworn to & subscribed Before me Sept. 26}           (signed)  R. J. Wheaton
AD. 1859        (signed) J.G. Noles Recorder}

State of Louisiana     }
Bienville Parish          }
I hereby certify that the above & foregoing is a true & correct Record of the original as filed Sept. 26, 1859, & duly Recorded October 3rd 1859.
                                                                                    John G. Noles Recorder”

Source: Bienville Parish, Louisiana, Conveyance Records, 1848-1900, F: 120, 
Hugh Hammontree, deed to E. & T. B. Billings, 3 Oct 1859; FHL microfilm 266,009.



© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Sunday, June 17, 2012

Father's Day 2012 - Pictures of My Ancestors

I don't have many photographs of my male ancestors, but here are those I do have, starting with my dad and going back to my maternal 3rd great-grandfather.

Jasper Jackson Spurlock II
1912-1978
Daddy

Jasper J. Spurlock I
1876-1940
Paternal Grandfather

William L. Yawman
1870-1948
Maternal Grandfather

John F. Spurlock
1850-1945
Paternal Great-Grandfather

Michael H. Yawman
1842-1913
Maternal Great-Grandfather

Houston T. Owens
1816-1895
Paternal 2nd Great-Grandfather

Andrew Yawman
1810-1891
Maternal 2nd Great-Grandfather

Ephraim Cary
1790-1878
Maternal 3rd Great-Grandfather


© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Sunday's Obituary - Ephraim Cary (1790-1878)

Very little biographical information about my 3rd great-grandfather Ephraim Cary is provided in this obituary. He served in the War of 1812, married Matilda Gandy in 1818 in Madison County, and was the father of 9 children, including Rhoda (Cary) Franklin, my 2nd great-grandmother. His earliest recorded land purchase was in 1829; the deed is transcribed here. He is believed to be buried in Maskill Cemetery in Union County, Ohio, but attempts to find a gravestone have been unsuccessful.

I am indebted to Virginia (Ginny) Smith, a researcher from Union County, Ohio, who provided this copy of his obituary.

Marysville Tribune, Marysville, Ohio, 25 December 1878.

"OBITUARY.

Another Pioneer Gone. -- Died, in Leesburg township, on the 7th of December, 1878, Ephraim Cary, aged 88 years and eight months.

The deceased was born in Washington county, Pa., and emigrated to Ohio in 1796, and settled near Marietta, and in 1801 moved to Madison county, near Plain City, and in 1826 moved to Union county. On the 16th day of December, 1826, he moved on the farm where he died, being fifty-two years. The deceased was a Presbyterian in faith and died in the hope of a better [life?]."




© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Saturday, June 16, 2012

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - How Popular Was Your Name?

This week, Randy Seaver of GeneaMusings issued the following mission for Saturday Night Genealogy Fun:

1) Go to the Popular Baby Name page on the Find the Best website at http://popular-baby-names.findthebest.com/.
2) Enter your given name into the search box, click the appropriate gender button, and click on the "All" Decade button. Note the results for your given name.
3) Tell us about how the popularity of your name has changed over the decades. Were you named during the buildup, the height, or the drawdown of the popularity of your given name?
4) Share your results in a blog post of your own, in comments to this blog post, or in a Facebook status or Google+ Stream post.


I haven’t participated in Saturday Night Genealogy Fun for while but this sounded like fun. In fact, it was so much fun, I got a little carried away!

My first name—Denise—first appears in the Roaring 20s with a rank of 967 and grows steadily until its peak in the 1950s at #26 in the standings. It remains relatively stable in the 1960s and then begins a steady decline in popularity each decade until the present with a ranking of 340. My parents chose my name at the height of its popularity.

Jacqueline, my middle name, first appears in the rankings for the 1900s at a rank of 652; beginning in the 1930s it is in the top 100 names and stays there through the 2000s bouncing around between a rank of 51 and 100.

Just for kicks, I checked on my younger sister’s given names as well:

Jennifer, her first name, appears on the charts during the 1940s at #207, and increases to #1 in the 1970s, drops to #2 in the 1980s, and in the 2000s has dropped to 37. She was named during the buildup of the popularity of her name.

Her middle name—Jeannine—appears in the rankings from the 1920s to the 1970s, but the highest rank is 316 in the 1930s.

And to round it out, my son’s name—Christopher—is in the rankings from 1880 through today, reaching the height of its popularity at #2 in the 1970s, staying there through the 1980s and 1990s, dropping to #5 in the 2000s. I chose his name at the peak of its popularity.

  


© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Surname Saturday – Ancestor #18 – Houston T. Owens


One of my goals for 2012 is to use the Surname Saturday blogging prompt as a way to assure that I spend some time researching each of my family lines and that I have appropriate source citations for the genealogical facts related to my ancestors. I’ve decided to use my ahnentafel report and work back through the generations starting with my grandparents, writing a summary of each ancestor. 

If you discovered this post through a search engine and find one of your ancestors listed here, please leave a comment to let me know.

My paternal 2nd great-grandfather Houston T. Owens was born 24 March 1816[1] probably in Tennessee.[2] His middle initial may stand for Thomas or Taylor. His parents are unknown.

Houston married Sherreldia Jane Hammontree on 29 December 1841 in Talladega County, Alabama.[3] They had fifteen children:
  • Andrew J. Owens (1841-?)[4]
  • Nancy C. Owens (1843-1930)[5]
  • Missouri Ann Owens (1845-1927)[6]
  • Dialtha Jane Owens (1847-1893)[7] – my great-grandmother
  • Rachel B. Owens (1849-1851)
  • Hughes R. Owens (1851-1916)[8]
  • Rebecca Ursula Owens (1852-1928)[9]
  • Thomas Alexander Owens (1855-1919)[10]
  • Gabriel Houston Owens (1858-1928)[11]
  • Sarah A. Owens (1861-1947)[12]
  • Steward S. Owens (1864-1937)[13]
  • Sarilda Angeline Owens (1866-1906)[14]
  • John Darius Owens (1868-1951)[15]
  • Charles Taylor Owens (1870-1945)[16]
  • Belzora Owens (1872-died young)[17]


Because Houston reportedly married in Talladega County, Alabama, in 1841, I looked for him there in the 1840 census. Although he is not enumerated by name, there are two families in which he may be enumerated. The families of Bird Owens and Thomas Owens both have males in the 20-30 age group and either might be his family of origin. More research is needed, but for the moment I believe he may be the son of Thomas Owens.

I have found a land patent issued to Houston T. Owens on 1 September 1849 for the purchase of just under 40 acres of land in Randolph County, Alabama.[18] At that time, Talladega and Randolph counties were right next to each other.

However, just a year later, Houston is enumerated in the 1850 federal census for Bienville Parish, Louisiana, where he is living two visits away from his father-in-law Hugh Hammontree.[19] Although the census date was 1 June 1850, the date of the visitation to the Owens’ family was 18 November 1850.

I haven’t yet found Houston’s original land purchase in Louisiana. In 1860, he was enumerated in Claiborne Parish,[20] but in 1870[21] and 1880,[22] he was enumerated in Bienville Parish.

I have located several deeds in Bienville Parish records naming Houston as grantor, but the most significant is one recorded 14 June 1900, in which his heirs sold his property to R. W. Caskey.

Houston died 15 September 1895 and is buried at Hurricane Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana.[23]

The areas of research on which I most want to focus are:
  1. Property transactions in Alabama and Louisiana to which Houston was a party.
  2. Identifying his parents.
  3. Any anecdotal information that might be available from other descendants.





[1] Kelly Christian Priestly, "Hurricane Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana," transcription, USGenWeb Archives (http://files.usgwarchives.org/la/claiborne/cemeteries/hurrican.txt : accessed 2 May 2011), Houston T. Owens. Birthdate is calculated based on age at death of 79 years, 5 months, 22 days.
[2] 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Western District, Bienville, Louisiana, p. 288A, family 559, household of Huston T. Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Jan 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 230.
[3] Houston T. and Sarilda Owens Photograph, unknown date; digital image, privately held by Theressa Horton, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] . 2010. Marriage date and plate were written on the bottom of the photograph by Theressa Horton’s mother, Sunshine Lowrey Horton, 2nd great-granddaughter of Houston Owens.
[4] 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Western District, Bienville, Louisiana, p. 288A, family 559, household of Huston T. Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Jan 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 230.
[5] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Nancy C. Owens, Memorial #15477081, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 Aug 2006.
[6] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Missouri Anne Owens Spurlock, Memorial #15541349, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[7] Dialtha Owens Spurlock Photograph of grave marker, 1999; digital image, privately held by Denise Spurlock, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lomita, Callifornia. 2012.
[8] Charles I. Caskey, Descendants of Houston T. Owens.
[9] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Rebecca Ursula Owens Sims, Memorial #21341670, created by Terri Carter, 3 September 2007.
[10] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Thomas Alexander Owens, Memorial #15541142, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[11] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Gabriel Houston Owens, Memorial #15541182, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[12] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Sarah Ann Owens, Memorial #15477146, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 August 2006.
[13] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Steward S. Owens, Memorial #15477194, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 August 2006.
[14] Charles I. Caskey, Descendants of Houston T. Owens.
[15] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), John Darius Owens, Memorial #54034110, created by Debbra, 23 Jun 2010.
[16] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Charles Taylor Owens, Memorial #15477291, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 23 August 2006.
[17] Find A Grave, online database (www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 Jun 2012), Belzora Owens Owens, Memorial #15541105, created by Foster L. Spurlock, 28 August 2006.
[18] Accession No. AL3170_.077, Certificate No. 10129, Houston T. Owens, dated 1 Sep 1849, Monroe, Louisiana, General Land Office; Cash entry files; Records of the Bureau of Land Management; digital images, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management General Land Office Records (www.glorecords.blm.gov : accessed 7 Oct 2011).
[19] 1850 U.S. census, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, population schedule, Western District, p. 288A, family 559, household of Huston T. Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 Jan 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 230.
[20] 1860 U.S. census, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, population schedule, Ward 6, p. 728, dwelling 1094, family 1094, household of H. T. Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 Mar 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 410.
[21] 1870 U.S. census, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, population schedule, Ward 1, p. 17A, dwelling 240, family 240, Houston Owins; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 Jan 2012); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 507.
[22] 1880 U.S. census, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, population schedule, 1st Ward, enumeration district (ED) 6, p. 36 (penned), dwelling 313, family 313, Houston Owens; digital images, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 Jan 2012); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 448.
[23] Huston T. Owens gravestone photograph, 1999; digital image, privately held by Denise Spurlock, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lomita, California. 2011.


© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Wordless Wednesday - Daddy c1942

Digital image. Original held by Karen Chaney Danielsen, [ADDRESS
WITHHELD FOR PRIVACY], Lone Grove, Oklahoma, 2011.
Jasper Jackson "Jack" Spurlock (left) with 
brother-in-law Ocie McBride, 
daughter Gloria Jane Spurlock (left),
 and niece Mary Ida McBride
c1942, probably in Houston, Texas

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Newspaper Confirms Marriage of Alexander Gandy and Tamson Cary

In my previous posts about recent research on Alexander Gandy and his wife Tamson Cary, I referred to their marriage in Union County, Ohio, in December of 1853. However, when I searched for their marriage record, I found a license issued on 21 December 1853, but no marriage return had been recorded. Here is a copy of the marriage record from Union County, Ohio.

"Ohio County Marriages, 1790-1950", Union County marriages,
FHL film number 573776, Gandy-Cary, 1853; index and images,
FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 Feb 2012).

Some newspapers for the area have been digitized, but none as far back as 1853. However, Suzanne Keinbaum, Reference Assistant at the Marysville (Ohio) Public Library, found the newspaper in which the following announcement appeared:

"Married," Marysville Tribune, 28 December 1853, p. 3, col. 1. 

Many thanks to Suzanne for finding this evidence that Alexander and Tamson were actually married!

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Sunday, June 10, 2012

Sunday's Obituary - Alexander Gandy (1832-1919)


Alexander Gandy, my maternal 2nd cousin, 3 times removed, is the subject of an ongoing research project which I wrote about here and here. I continue to collaborate with another researcher to try to solve the mysteries surrounding Tamson (Cary) (Gandy) Kirby, Alexander’s first wife.

“TAPS SOUNDED FOR CIVIL WAR VETERAN
———
Alexander Gandy, Who Marched With Sherman to the Sea, Dies at Dayton at age of 87.
———
In writing of the death of a former resident of Richwood, the Dayton Journal of July 10, said:

Funeral services for Alexander Gandy, 87, who died Tuesday night at his home, 67 Vincent street, will be held this afternoon at 4 o'clock at the residence. Burial in Woodland cemetery.

'He is survived by two daughters, Miss Ida Gandy and Mrs. George Gengnagel, of Dayton, and a granddaughter, Mrs. P. D. Yarbrough, of Clinton, Ill.

'Mr. Gandy had been a resident of Dayton for more than 20 years. He was a soldier in one of the most active regiments of the Civil war, under Col. A. B. Robinson, 121 O. V. L, in Co. I, and with the 121st was mustered into service at Delaware, O., Sept. 11, 1862, and served until June 8, 1865, when they were mustered out at Washington, D.C.

'The regiment participated in the battles of Chicamaugua, Lookout mountain, Mission Ridge, Kenesaw mountain. He marched with Sherman to the sea and also had a part in the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, the last battle of the war.

'He was wounded in battle of Mission Ridge, but in a short time rejointed [sic] the regiment.'

Many of the older residents of Richwood will remember Mr. Gandy, was a brick and tile manufacturer years ago. He made the brick for the Blake residence, now owned by W. H. Richards; the Odd Fellows building; the grade school building and others.

Mrs. Ben Woods of Richwood is a sister of Mr. Gandy. She and Miss Alma Donohoe went to Dayton to attend the funeral.”

Source: "Taps Sounded For Civil War Veteran," Richwood Gazette, 17 Jul 1919, p. 1, col. 2; digital images, NewspaperARCHIVE (access.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 7 May 1912).




© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Wordless Wednesday - Daddy c1930

Digital image. Original held by Karen Chaney Danielsen, [ADDRESS
WITHHELD FOR PRIVACY], Lone Grove, Oklahoma, 2011.
Jasper Jackson "Jack" Spurlock,
circa 1930, in front of a cafe,
probably in Houston, Texas

© 2012 Denise Spurlock

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Update on the Gandy/Cary/Kirby Mystery


In previous posts here and here, I have shared information regarding the mystery surrounding the events which led to Tamson (Cary) Gandy leaving her husband Alexander Gandy and embarking on a relationship with Robert Phares Kirby, a married man who was twenty years older than she.

While we still have not discovered the true story of what happened, my fellow researcher Keith and I continue to find bits and pieces of information that tie the families together prior to that fateful event (whatever it was!).

  • The document below, a school census taken in 1843, was found by a researcher in Union County, Ohio. It shows that Robert Kirby lived as a neighbor of the Gandy and Cary families when Alexander and Tamson were about 11 and 8 years of age, respectively. It also lists four of Kirby’s children from his first marriage who likely were friends and schoolmates of Alexander and Tamson. What did these older children think when they found out that their father had deserted them and run off with a woman who had been their childhood acquaintance?

  • By 1850, Kirby and his family had removed to DeWitt County, Illinois. Henry Sheppard Gandy, Alexander’s uncle, moved with his family to DeWitt County sometime before 1860. Were Alexander and Tamson with Sheppard Gandy when he made this move? We don’t know.

  • The Union County, Ohio, deed indexes show numerous transactions involving members of Kirby’s family, the Gandy family, and other related families. Films have been ordered and perhaps a review of the actual deeds will provide valuable clues.

  • I have ordered several microfilms of newspapers from Union County for another purpose, but will also search them for any possible mention of Robert, Alexander, and Tamson.

  • Keith has been in contact with a descendant of Robert and Tamson who was planning to attend a family reunion this past weekend. Keith sent a summary of our findings and the various stories, along with some unidentified photographs, with the hope that someone at the reunion would be able to confirm or refute some of the stories and perhaps identify the people in the photos.

We are looking forward to whatever we may learn from all these various sources!



© 2012 Denise Spurlock